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June 21, 2016

Demystifying Ironmongery #1: Our Guide to Locks

Welcome to our series on demystifying ironmongery, where we investigate different aspects of hardware choice and functionality to help you make the right architectural hardware decisions. In the first issue we investigate different types of locks, their uses, advantages and disadvantages.

 

Hook Locks

 

 Untitled What are they?

A hook lock is a type of mortice lock with a pivoted spring bolt, the head of which is shaped in the form of a hook. This type of lock is usually fitted on sliding doors but can also be fitted to hinged doors. There are also keyed versions of this available

Attributes

Hook locks incorporate an anti-lift device and therefore provide a good level of security.

Cautions

These locks require a good level of accuracy when installing as there is little margin for error.

 

 

Rim Night Latches

 

Untitled What are they?

A surface mounted lock that is fitted to the surface, on to the inside face of the door. There are versions available with a roller latch and also a standard latch bolt. This type of lock is generally used on front entrance doors.

Attributes

Night latches are simple and quick to fit. They can be used for many types of door and are available for various levels of security. The roller latch versions are compliant with NHBC requirements.

Cautions

Night latches are rather rudimentary and what we associate with very traditional applications. They are not available in our full range of finishes.

 

 

Multi-point Locks

 

Untitled What are they?

A multi-point lock is cut into the edge of the door stile, and runs in most cases from the top to bottom of the stile. They afford up to as many as 5 locking points. The locking points are all operable from the main locking box in the center where the lever handle or euro cylinder is situated negating the need for more than one key and one pair of escutcheons.

Attributes

Multi-point locks are very secure indeed, and negate the need for several mortice locks as was the old tradition. They also come in a variety of designs, with possible options for meeting the PAS24 standards. Double versions are also available for French door sets.

Cautions

Multi-point locks are quite labour intensive to install so do not underestimate this when considering your costings. This type of lock can be complicated to specify so please go through your requirements carefully with our sales staff.

 

 

Latch Locks

 

Untitled What are they?

A latch lock is an upright mortice lock, consisting of a latch bolt and a key operated bolt. For example, a latch lock will work with either door knobs or lever handles.   There are also versions available that can be locked by a snib rather than a key.

Attributes

A secure and tidy solution for lockable doors with numerous backset and keyway options available.

Cautions

Where latch locks are used on external doors, avoid the use of thumbturns internally, especially where the doors are glazed and an intruder can break the glass and then undo the thumbturn allowing easy access to the house.

 

 

Dead Locks
Untitled What are they?

A dead lock is generally a mortice lock having only a square-ended deadbolt operable from one or both sides by key, available with traditional and euro profile keyways. A number of backset options are available at various levels of security.

Attributes

Dead locks are a discreet and secure locking solution that can be used for many applications. Generally used on external doors for additional security, and can be used with an internal thumbturn for escape applications. High security versions have anti-cut rollers inserted into the dead bolt increasing the level of security and are supplied with heavy duty strike box to resist attack on the frame.

Cautions

A good level of carpentry skills are required for the installing of mortice locks properly. Keyed deadbolt locks add an additional step in the unlocking process, and must not be used as fire exit doors.

 

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